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FAQ

Why does the TSA limit carry-on liquids, aerosols, and gels to 3.4 ounces (100 mL)?
This rule originated in August 2021 when international authorities announced they had averted a terrorist plot to bring liquid explosives onto one or more airplanes concealed in Gatorade bottles, shampoo bottles, etc. Those bottles could be pretty big, as big as 16 or 20 fluid ounces in capacity. The chemicals would not individually be explosive until they were combined inside the plane while it was in flight but in those combined volumes I guess they could generate a pretty big blast.In the immediate aftermath of this event no liquids or creams or gels of any kind were allowed in carryon baggage, causing some people I know to become lip balm smugglers because they could not get through a flight without it. This restriction was relaxed relatively quickly, maybe after a few weeks.So the idea now is that 3 ounces of liquid (100 ml) is a small enough amount that it would be impracticable for a terrorist group to smuggle a large enough volume of potential liquid explosives onto an airplane to do serious damage, and if you had a large number of people trying to combine liquids it would attract the attention of other passengers and the flight attendants.
How can I bring ice tea onto an airplane past TSA? Last year, they pulled me over, a 13 year old, for having a sealed iced tea in my carry on and forced me to throw it out.
Sorry. You don't.Like everyone else flying commercially, you must follow the rules to fit liquids in 3 ounces or less sized containers into your quart sized clear bag or put them in your checked bag. Iced tea in a commercially sold bottle is too large. I'm a judge with a security clearance, special government ID, additional Global Entry, TSA Pre-check and all of that jazz and, TSA still throws out my water or other drink if I forget it is in my purse when I get to airport security. They don't care who anyone is, even flight crews. I even got frisked and wiped for bomb residue the last time I flew earlier this month.You can take an empty reusable water bottle through security along with a Mio type liquid tea concentrate in your 311 bag because those Mio type bottles are small enough.Otherwise, you can buy those little iced tea packets that are made to mix with a 16.9 ounces bottle of water and buy a bottle of water inside security or fill your empty bottle from a drinking fountain.See below examples of the size items I mean which came from my carry-on bag, although the flavors obviously are different.
What is your craziest TSA experience?
January 1, 2021. I got searched more thoroughly in Boston than I have had, before or since. Sorry for length, it’s going to read like a paperback novel:New Years Eve, 2021. I was scheduled for a flight from Bakersfield to Philadelphia. It was raining hard (which always throws California for a loop) and my flight to connect in LAX would never make it in time to my connecting flight. All west coast flights were delayed. (except, of course, LAX-PHL, it would have arrived at midnight)“We can get you out tomorrow, if you come back in then”, the ticket agent told me. …New Years Day. I was doubtful - I had already checked the routes and every plane was full. My own search suggested that I might get out TWO days later. I asked them to please check anything available.“Chicago? We can get you there, but no further.” No, that didn’t do me much good. My geographically challenged agent asked me to name some cities in the east that would be acceptable.I asked, “How about Harrisburg? I know that there are several flights per day Chicago to Harrisburg, it’s closer to home.” (Although my car was in Philly, I had family members who wouldn’t mind coming to get me there and I could worry about my car later).“No, sorry. All Harrisburg planes show as being full.”“Well, even closer to home is Lancaster, Reading, and Allentown. Moving outward from there, in order, Baltimore, Newark, Dulles, National, or even JFK would do.”“I don’t see anything”, she said. “Wait a second - how about Boston? I can get you there at 6:00 AM tomorrow.”“You mean Boston, and then it’s up to me to figure out how to get home from there?”“No, no‡ I can switch you to a different airline from Boston to Philadelphia at 8:00 AM.”“OK, I’ll go with that option.” …And then the adventure began.I got to Boston as promised, with instructions to go to Special Services, where I could pick up my boarding pass. “Computer here says your flight landed in Philadelphia last night.”“I got re-booked due to weather. I could not make that flight from LAX to PHL, so now here I am”.“Noooooo. The computer says you were on that flight.”I had my drivers license, my passport, and showed them my boarding pass LAX to BOS to prove that me being 2 places simultaneously would have been impossible.The counter agent said, “I have to call somebody in management to sort this out.” At this point, I was not worried - just slightly annoyed. One call, two calls, and I could tell they were not getting much good info. By then, a policeman had wandered over, standing by silently.“We can’t call Bakersfield, where all this started, because no one is there yet, at 3:30 AM. The district manager says that what must have happened was that they didn’t change your itinerary right there and therefore shows that you made it to Philadelphia.”“Obviously not, for the reasons we’ve already discussed”, was my reply, still polite, but with some urgency creeping into my voice. The police officer moved closer.A 4th phone call. “OK, I’ve been instructed to issue a boarding pass for the Philadelphia flight. This officer will accompany you to security.”I looked at my boarding pass. “SSSS”. Circled twice in red. I had enough experience to know what that meant! Luckily (or perhaps not), it was a quiet early morning on New Years Day and not many travelers were around. They emptied out everything from my carry on, had me boot up my laptop and show them something, anything with my name on it (pretty easy since it booted to “Michael Frey” and business documents and emails were plentiful). Then came the personal search.“Would you prefer that this be done in private?”“Will I have to take my clothes off?”“No, but I will be reaching inside your shirt and belt line during the search.”“OK”Oh, he reached here, he reached there, he reached everywhere. He followed the hem lines of my underwear. A piece of paper was retrieved from pants pockets: the original printed itinerary. Everyone gathered closer to look at it, but no comments were made.“You’re free to go, Mr. Frey. Have a nice day.”…My first experience with the swab test (Fresno) was somewhat eventful also - my son is in law enforcement and he took me to the airport. More searching! Apparently, there was enough gunpowder residue in his truck that it set off the detector. I waited until the question was asked. “Did you handle a firearm today?” “No, I sat next to my son, a LEO who is fully armed, his weapon was 6 inches from my left hand”.
How many other Quorans "opt out" rather than go through the TSA scanning machines at airport security?
I always opt out, every time, and have done so from the moment the scanners were first introduced. When the TSA modified its policies in December 2021 to allow TSA staff to arbitrarily deny passengers the right to opt out and receive a pat down instead of going through the millimeter wave scanners, I stopped flying entirely, and haven't boarded a plane since.My rationale:The type of radiation used by the latest breed of machines (millimeter wave radiation) is new and the long-term effects on the human body are not yet understood. It took over 20 years for the harmful effects of cellphone radiation to be understood, but we now know beyond a reasonable doubt that holding a cellphone against your head during a call does in fact increase your risk of developing a brain tumor in a small but statistically significant way (I can prreferences to research articles in peer-reviewed journals on request). In 20 years' time, we may be saying the same thing about millimeter wave scanners. The machines used by the TSA have not been rigorously tested. What we do know, so far, is that millimeter wave radiation can tear apart the two strands of DNA. I personally would prefer not to get cancer, or experience any other medical condition that might be caused by these scanners.History is littered with cases of injuries and fatalities caused by malfunctioning, misconfigured, or incorrectly operated medical scanners such as X-ray machines. If professional radiologists cannot maintain and operate these machines correctly 100% of the time, I certainly don't trust the TSA to do so. Yes, the theoretical dose of radiation delivered by these machines may be small - but all it takes is a power surge, electronics failure, or who knows what, for a much larger dose of radiation to be delivered to the passenger than claimed by the TSA. The medical devices have to undergo more extensive testing and certification than the TSA scanners. I'll save my limited radiation budget for my doctor. Body scanners that emit no radiation but instead use passive environmental radiation to image the body do exist, but the TSA has not switched to them and has not announced any plans to do so.Studies show that the scanners are in practice largely ineffective anyway in detecting concealed objects. Running the security theater show may prentertainment for the TSA and make the average Joe feel safer, but if it carries real medical risks (as it does), I do not wish to be one of the lemmings on the TSA's stage.The TSA broke various laws and failed to follow appropriate lawmaking procedures in the way it introduced the scanners. The organization is being sued by many organizations (e.g. EPIC) and individuals over the mandatory use of the body scanners.The scanners are a violation of privacy.
Would TSA be able to find out if I have a gerbil on my person as I pass through the airport security?
Yes, a gerbil will show up on a body scanner. Gerbils have bones and body mass, just like humans.
Who would carry out airport security if the TSA was disbanded?
The same revolving-door hodgepodge of minimum wage, minimally trained, uncoordinated and disconnected screeners on duty on 9/11.With a lot less real-time intelligence informing their work, and a lot less ability to shift inspection emphasis areas based on known or emerging threats.Using whatever slickly marketed, uncertified and low-cost equipment manufacturers can sell piecemeal all over the country.“Security theater” critics don’t have the slightest idea what they’re talking about or how far we’ve come since the 2021 attacks. TSA is a helluva lot more than the folks at the magnetometers. Even the instances where weapons are successfully smuggled through the checkpoints for isnpection/testing purposes prmore opportunities to learn from mistakes and new bad guy techniques. (Where do you think these methods come from, anyway?)
At airport security, how does TSA decide whether to use the advanced imaging scanner versus the traditional metal detector?
There's considerable anecdotal evidence that women, particularly younger women, are selected more often for advanced imaging scans. For example: http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2012/02/...